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Post Info TOPIC: New Jarvis interview at the film festival red carpet yesterday!!


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New Jarvis interview at the film festival red carpet yesterday!!
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https://youtu.be/fQ7GVLqwE-U



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"New Pulp music". Got to love an interviewer that's done their research!

Nice little chat though, thanks for posting. Looking forward to seeing this film.

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She could have made a bigger fool of herself, you could just tell she didn't have much of an idea as to what Jarvis has been doing for the last 20 years. Still, it's an entertainment channel, presumably for casual viewers who might react with a "Ooh, is that the bloke who flashed Michael Jackson? He looks a bit rough now, doesn't he?" etc.

Anyway, I think he said near the beginning that he's been writing new music so that's the important thing.

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Thanks for posting - the interview put me onto the animated Aline video, which I'd missed. Though he said they'd studied his dance moves,  I don't think I'd recognise that as Jarvis with the sound off.

Video was a bit fuzzy, but looked like the moustache is resurgent.



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Nebula, you have a talent for tracking down press/interviews etc. Do you know if there's any articles where Wes Anderson talks about Jarvis/Pulp and whether he was a fan or how he met Jarvis etc.?

There's something about the aesthetic of both where you can see why they may have a shared appreciation for looking at things and being creative. I'd like to hear about their relationship.

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French Dispatch intro with Jarvis, though little information:

The criterion version of Fantastic Mr Fox is released in November (region B), with a Wes Anderson commentary... maybe that will have something.

The region A version came out years ago, I believe - wonder if anyone here has a copy?  Quite fancy it.  Quite fancy all the Wes Anderson criterions, but it's a lot of money to spend on a film.

 



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Eamonn wrote:

Nebula, you have a talent for tracking down press/interviews etc. Do you know if there's any articles where Wes Anderson talks about Jarvis/Pulp and whether he was a fan or how he met Jarvis etc.?

There's something about the aesthetic of both where you can see why they may have a shared appreciation for looking at things and being creative. I'd like to hear about their relationship.


 

I have looked for this as well, and agree. They have that whole Time Burton/Danny Elfman 'filmmaker/movie songman' kinship thing brewing. Artistic soulmates. Would love to hear more on those two together. Looked some more, but the closest I have seen...is just this: 

https://rushmoreacademy.com/2009/06/wes-and-jarvis-talk-mr-fox-in-the-new-issue-of-interview/

 

Wondering if he discussed it during any of his Sunday Service shows? Hmmmm. 



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Interview from The Times today (by the journalist who interviewed him for his Sky Arts Songbook episode in 2009) and it contains quotes on his meeting Wes Anderson.
Paywalled but I get a free article a week. Here y'go (with the comments section so you get a flavour of what some readers think of him). I must say, whenever Jarvis talks about politics, he has a tendency to come across as quite crass and selfish. It's always about how he's prrsonally been put-out by Brexit etc. (and I speak as a remainer).

Anyway...

***

Jarvis Cocker: from Common People to The French Dispatch
As the singer releases songs he wrote for Wes Andersons new film, he tells Will Hodgkinson how Pulps fame went sour

Will Hodgkinson
Thursday October 21 2021, 5.00pm, The Times
It is the London launch for The French Dispatch, Wes Andersons meticulously stylish cinematic homage to the golden age of print journalism. Jarvis Cocker, of Sheffield, is serenading Laetitia Sadier, of Paris, with Paroles, paroles, a ballad sung originally by the French superstars Dalida and Alain Delon. Cocker looks increasingly desperate as he attempts to woo Sadier, of the cult band Stereolab, with his words of love. The performance, before a small crowd that includes an amused-looking Bill Murray, captures contemporary Anglo-French relations in a nutshell: an awkward Englishman trying to impress an indifferent Frenchwoman under the shadow of Brexit.

Laetitia was my French coach because it would have been terrible if I made a grave insult against French culture by getting the words wrong, says Cocker, who is the inspiration for a twig-thin pop star called Tip-Top in The French Dispatch. Cockers version of the 1960s hit Aline also serves as the films theme song, and now he has made an entire album of French covers, Chansons dEnnui Tip-Top, to accompany the films release. I did French at school, I married a French woman [the stylist Camille Bidault-Waddington is his ex-wife] and I have lived in Paris on and off for nearly 20 years. My French really should be a lot better than it is.

Of all the stars of 1990s music to have broken through to mainstream recognition, Cocker is the only one you can imagine making an album like this: a stylish, irreverent homage to the kind of 45s you might find by rooting around a vide-grenier on the outskirts of Paris. Hes also one of the few who has managed to lead a relatively normal life, despite being a familiar figure since Common People by his old band Pulp became an alternative national anthem in 1995.

Jarvis Cocker: When Pulp finished, I wondered if I should even do music at all

Were speaking in the offices of his management company off Portobello Road he got the Tube from the Shepherds Bush home of his girlfriend, the fashion consultant Kim Sion, to be here. Hes turned up with his dog, a suspicious-looking chihuahua called Tony. Apart from a brief period of fame hell in the second half of the 1990s of which more later Cocker does seem to have kept his brown leather brogues on the ground.

The other day I was coming out of the business-class section of the plane because I was actually flying for business when some knobhead went, Why wasnt you with the common people at the back of the aeroplane? says Cocker, aping a loutish shout. On the whole, though, people are very pleasant. I arrived here on public transport and nobody came up to me. Perhaps Ive simply aged a great deal in the past year and a half.

Cocker, actually a youthful, clean-shaven 58-year-old, is a record-collecting, secondhand-clothes wearing, midcentury modern furniture-buying enthusiast for all things past, which makes him a perfect fit for Andersons stylised world. The French Dispatch features a scene in a café called Les Sans Blague where Timothée Chalamets May 1968-era student revolutionary is listening to Cocker, as Tip-Top, singing Aline.

He likes this record by Tip-Top, but his girlfriend says Tip-Top is a puppet of the corporate capitalist system, Cocker explains in his flat northern tones. Tip-Top looks like me, but from a very long time ago, so Wes suggested making an album of Tip-Tops greatest hits. It gave me the chance to sing all these French songs I really like.

The French Dispatch romanticises Gallic life from a foreigners viewpoint, which is what Cocker has done on Chansons dEnnui Tip-Top. It started with Serge Gainsbourg, he says of his enthusiasm for French pop. I always knew there was good French music, so when I moved to Paris I thought, This will be great. I can discover so much more. They had an oldies station called Nostalgie, and I was so disappointed because it played absolute shit, but if you listen to Radio 2 youll hear appalling English music too.

The post-Brexit timing of an album of French songs by an English singer appealed to Cocker, whose 18-year-old son, Albert, lives in Paris and who still has a flat there. I took Brexit hard. Ive been working in Spain [on Andersons next film, Asteroid City] and now you have to get a visa to stay in Europe for more than 90 days, which means I might need to get a visa just to see my son.


Were going on tour and Im dying to play in Paris, but its going to cost so much more now. Theres even a crazy thing to do with lorries. If you take your gear from the UK, you can now only make three stops in Europe before the lorry has to come back. This is called cabotage, and it is at the heart of our current supply-chain crisis. What European tour is only three dates? Dont get me started on this stuff.

Whatever our feelings on Brexit, I point out to Cocker, it was the product of a vote. And now those people who voted for it cant drive their cars, he replies, with a hint of schadenfreude. It was just a pointless thing to do. I liked feeling European. I liked that there wasnt much difference between leaving St Pancras for a train to Sheffield or a train to Paris, and after the vote I just felt really embarrassed. I felt I had to personally apologise to French people.

When Cocker explains where he met Anderson, in 2006 at a wrap party for Sofia Coppolas film Marie Antoinette held in the Palais de Versailles, it does sound as if he is at the heart of the Eurostar-hopping, champagne-quaffing, brie-chomping liberal elite that Brexiteers get so worked up about.

Actually, it was atrocious, he says of the party. I was DJing, the disco was in this massive glasshouse so you couldnt hear anything, nobody was dancing and it was a horrible cacophony. I was quite crestfallen, but then I bumped into Wes. We stayed in touch, and I know it drives him mad when people say his films are a bit cold because the way he works is very human. He invites you into his journey by showing you where his ideas come from.


Chansons dEnnui Tip-Top turned out to be a life saver for Cocker and his band. In spring 2020 they were about to go on tour with Beyond the Pale, an album released under the name of Jarv Is, which takes Cockers observational style and applies it to everything from the human statues you see outside tourist attractions (Sometimes I Am Pharaoh) to a love song based on the history of evolution (Must I Evolve?). An album of remixed versions of the songs, made to accompany the tour, was also in the works. Then lockdown hit and an album of French songs was something the band members, stuck in various parts of Britain and unable to meet, were at least able to work on remotely.

I was in the Peak District so it wasnt too bad for me, Cocker says, but it did feel like a really frightening sneak peek at retirement. You turned on the telly and there were old people in a care home, getting a needle stuck in their arm, and I thought, Is this whats in store for me? Then there was Albert coming to the end of school and it all just petered out, which will give kids who graduated at that time a cynical view of the system. Youre going through something that is meant to be really important, and then they make up the grades at the end of it.

All of this will probably crop up in future Cocker songs because of a revelation he had in his early twenties: to write about lived experience. In 1985, not long after forming Pulp, Cocker was trying to impress a girl in Sheffield by pretending to be Spider-Man when he fell out of a window and ended up in hospital for three months. Listening to the stories of the roofers and builders in the beds next to him, he realised that instead of trying to be some lofty artiste, he should document life as it unfolded. The results run from Britpop classics such as Sorted for Es & Wizz and Common People to songs on Beyond the Pale such as Swanky Modes, a portrait of Camden in the 1990s. I tell Cocker that I found one line in the song, about a heroin addict hissing, Why dont you get on this? to passers-by, creepy in the extreme.


That happened in the early 1990s, when my dream was to live in Camden, Cocker says. Eventually my dream came true, and I was living in a room in a dishevelled house with a drug dealer. Near by was an apartment block where we bought the tickets for the first rave I went to, which is mentioned in Sorted for Es & Wizz, and I was walking on a bridge over the canal one day when I looked down to see this guy shooting up on the towpath. Just to see someone do that in broad daylight was so crazy it stuck with me.

Back then, Pulp were on the fringes of the fringe. Cocker formed the band while still at school at the dawn of the 1980s, but success proved minimal and after a decade he went to Central Saint Martins art school in London to study film. It was the one thing I really wanted to do, says Cocker of being a pop star. But I ended up thinking, You had a go, it didnt work out, youd better do something else. Then Pulp resurrected itself, seemingly spontaneously, and I was really excited because for the first half of the 1990s indie music was reaching more and more people. It felt like the revolution was coming.

And then it wasnt. When Pulp performed Common People at Glastonbury in 1995, headlining at the last minute after the Stone Roses pulled out, it was one of those rare celebratory, communal moments in British history. I know it sounds corny to say that music effects social change, but I really thought it could, Cocker says. Then the mainstream showed its strength. What we were doing lost focus and dissipated.

After Cocker got up and wiggled his bottom during Michael Jacksons Earth Song at the 1996 Brit awards, a drunken protest at the messianic self-regard of Jacksons performance, his level of fame went from perfectly manageable to absolutely horrific. For a year or so afterwards he couldnt walk down the street without being shouted at. It led to a nervous breakdown and a period of isolation.


The fall-out from Michael Jackson was that I went into a tabloid world that I didnt really like, and it was doing my head in, he says. After that it became hard to write songs because I would think, Do I actually want this to become popular? When Pulp finished, I wondered if I should even do music at all.

Cocker: I know it sounds corny to say that music effects social change, but I really thought it could

In the end, Cocker decided to continue for the simple reason that he cant do anything else. Songs really are the way Ive tried to make sense of my life and express something about it. I get something good from writing a song. You mentioned Swanky Modes. I was only in Camden for six months, but for some reason, 30 years later, that period of my life got condensed into a song that just seemed to come out. You are dramatising your own existence.

By the end of our interview Im beginning to understand why people like Cocker so much. Despite his status as a world-famous rock star, despite being a stylish figure who hops between London and Paris and works on films with Anderson, a sense of no-nonsense Sheffield warmth and friendliness has never left him.

Im not cowering away like I was at the end of the 1990s because day-to-day life is where all my ideas come from, he concludes with downbeat acceptance. Kim might disagree with me about how much I live in reality, but Im fascinated with how people live their lives, how people fill their time, what is important to them, how they decorate their houses. Im a bit nosey, I suppose. And with that, Cocker takes Tony off for a walk.
Jarv Is . . . Remix Ed (Rough Trade) will be available exclusively on the Jarv Is UK tour, starting on November 2

Pop goes the movies: 5 rock stars who wrote soundtracks
by Henry Bird

Elton John The Lion King (1994)
After producing the soundtrack for the little-known 1971 British teenage romance Friends, Elton John didnt venture back into mainstream film-scoring until The Lion King, which became a behemoth of stage and screen. Songs such as Circle of Life and Hakuna Matata became the crown jewels of the Disney renaissance of the 1990s (although the best track is surely Be Prepared, with Jeremy Ironss sultry delivery). John was less than impressed with the recent remake, however, calling it a huge disappointment and claiming that the magic had been lost because they messed the music up.

Nick Cave The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007)
Nick Cave and his fellow Bad Seeds bandmate Warren Ellis have the monopoly when it comes to singers scoring westerns. They began in 2005 with The Proposition, an Australian western set in the outback, and went on to score Hell or High Water in 2016 and Wind River in 2017. Yet it is their evocative scoring of The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, draped in melancholy piano, sweeping orchestral passages and folk interludes, that stands out above the rest. Cave has a cameo as a saloon singer towards the end of the film, which one critic interpreted as the pop star by way of his score, telling the story all along.

Jonny Greenwood Phantom Thread (2017)

The lead guitarist of Radiohead first partnered with the director Paul Thomas Anderson to write the score for There Will Be Blood in 2007 and has returned for every one of his films since. He received his first Oscar nomination for Phantom Thread, starring Daniel Day-Lewis as a high-end fashion designer in 1950s London who enters into a dysfunctional relationship with a young waitress. Greenwood said that for inspiration he kept returning to Messiaen, Penderecki and Bach. Their influence is woven into the fabric of the soundtrack, a mix of romantic orchestral passages interspersed with haunting and dissonant harmonies.

Lady Gaga A Star is Born (2018)
Lady Gaga elevated herself to the status of such musical screen greats as Cher and Barbra Streisand when she starred in Bradley Coopers A Star is Born, a film powered by her soundtrack of power ballads, blues rock and country music. Gaga insisted that most of the soundtrack be recorded live, from the vast concert scenes to intimate supermarket car park duets, which reflects the organic nature of the music-making throughout; Cooper described writing and composing many of the songs while they were filming as an evolution, like the story. The films triumphant lead single, Shallow, went on to become one of the bestselling singles of all.

Kendrick Lamar Black Panther (2018)
When Marvels Black Panther roared on to the scene, it redefined what a blockbuster superhero epic could be, becoming the first such film to be nominated for a best picture Oscar. Its focus on the African-American and pan-African experience was reflected in Kendrick Lamars soundtrack, which, with Ludwig Göranssons orchestrations, was a welcome departure from traditional superhero film music. It featured an array of inter-continental black talent and authentic African instrumentation and dialects, combined with more modern synthesized tracks, to embody the films Afro-futurist themes.



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charlie white
17H AGO

One from the heart, soundtrack by Tom Waits dueting with Crystal Gayle.

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John Mulvany
14H AGO
Replying to charlie white

Tom Waits , best living contemporary songwriter, visceral, now yer talkin

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R Briggs
15H AGO
Replying to charlie white

Good choice

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Keeping it honest
13H AGO

How funny the writer thinks that "an awkward Englishman trying to impress an indifferent Frenchwoman" sums up the Anglo-French relationship after Brexit, and not this part, "Camille Bidault-Waddington is his (French) ex-wife"!

Reply

Recommend (3)
Keith Harding
10H AGO

Is it just me? Ive never got this guy. He always appears to have just climbed out of a builders skip.

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Recommend (3)
Michael Wade
1H AGO
Replying to Keith Harding

(Mrs Wade) Yes it's just you

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Recommend (1)
Cordelia Ryder
9H AGO
Replying to Keith Harding

It's not the builders skip it's just that a little talent can go a long way if you happen to hit the Zeitgeist.

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Recommend (1)
Moose
1H AGO

Brexit has really damaged British musicians trying to work in Europe. Johnny Marr makes the same point.

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Recommend (3)
Simon T
1H AGO
Replying to Moose

And Elton John, and pretty much anyone who knows what they're talking about.

Reply

Recommend (2)
Max
1H AGO
Replying to Moose

Musicians toured before the EU; it's called logistics and Britain is rather good at it. The fact that the EU don't like people leaving their corrupt club and are being obstructive as possible says it all.

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Brendan O'Leary
2H AGO

If I had to get a visa to see my family, as the millions of Brits with family in Australia or America do, I'd get a visa. What's the drama?

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CliveW
14H AGO

Jarvis should reboot Black Books Bernards long lost english cousin...

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John Mulvany
14H AGO

Pan jan drum

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Fran Wallace
1H AGO

Clean-shaven???

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Robert Thornton
1H AGO

Fascinated by people - hmm

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McLovin
2H AGO

McLovin says

Privileged remainer still embittered.

Move on.

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Simon T
1H AGO
Replying to McLovin

What's 'privilege' got to do with it? If anyone sounds bitter...

***



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RE: New Jarvis interview at the film festival red carpet yesterday!!
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Eamonn wrote:


All of this will probably crop up in future Cocker songs because of a revelation he had in his early twenties: to write about lived experience. In 1985, not long after forming Pulp, Cocker was trying to impress a girl in Sheffield by pretending to be Spider-Man when he fell out of a window and ended up in hospital for three months. Listening to the stories of the roofers and builders in the beds next to him, he realised that instead of trying to be some lofty artiste, he should document life as it unfolded. The results run from Britpop classics such as Sorted for Es & Wizz and Common People to songs on Beyond the Pale such as Swanky Modes, a portrait of Camden in the 1990s. I tell Cocker that I found one line in the song, about a heroin addict hissing, Why dont you get on this? to passers-by, creepy in the extreme.


 

Initially I groaned to see the Spiderman anecdote in yet another interview - along with the compulsory Michael Jackson reference - then was interested to read about the hospital bed epiphany to document ordinary life. I don't think I've heard that before? Freaks era lyrics certainly evoke the generally bleak mood of the north in 1985, but there isn't yet much of the observational stuff that came later.

While here, momentary Jarvis appearance at 3:05 in a French Dispatch promo:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vSJQAlEfLs



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Thanks very much for copying that article here! Really interesting read.

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Thank you for sharing that, Eamonn!! Excellent piece!

 

Paywall sites are annoying. 



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You're welcome!



-- Edited by Eamonn on Monday 25th of October 2021 01:18:56 AM

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New Jarvis interview at the film festival red carpet yesterday!!
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"Eurostar-hopping, champagne-quaffing, brie-chomping liberal elite." Does working for Murdoch oblige you to chuck things like that in, or is Hodgkinson just a bit of an arse?

[Post edited because it turns out Hodgo didn't actually say the other thing I thought he said]



-- Edited by Sturdy on Monday 25th of October 2021 10:18:03 PM

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200% and Bloody Thirsty

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That was a bit grumpy of me wasn't it? Sorry

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Sturdy wrote:

That was a bit grumpy of me wasn't it? Sorry


 I read your unedited post and it made me laugh 



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John Aizelwood on the other hand...

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Nebula wrote:
Eamonn wrote:

Nebula, you have a talent for tracking down press/interviews etc. Do you know if there's any articles where Wes Anderson talks about Jarvis/Pulp and whether he was a fan or how he met Jarvis etc.?

There's something about the aesthetic of both where you can see why they may have a shared appreciation for looking at things and being creative. I'd like to hear about their relationship.


 

I have looked for this as well, and agree. They have that whole Time Burton/Danny Elfman 'filmmaker/movie songman' kinship thing brewing. Artistic soulmates. Would love to hear more on those two together. Looked some more, but the closest I have seen...is just this: 

https://rushmoreacademy.com/2009/06/wes-and-jarvis-talk-mr-fox-in-the-new-issue-of-interview/

 

Wondering if he discussed it during any of his Sunday Service shows? Hmmmm. 


I remember coming across this photo a few years ago and thinking it seemed rather glamourous at the time.

https://jennilee.tumblr.com/post/23676742331/ezra-petronio-marc-jacobs-wes-anderson-jarvis 



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